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Affiliated Students

Chantal Croteau

ccroteau@umich.edu
Anthropology & CSEAS

My research examines Buddhist-Muslim relations in southern Thailand and focuses on the myriad forms of relatedness and belonging produced through everyday actions and practices of care.

Lisa Decenteceo

lddece@umich.edu
Musicology

Plural expressions of Igorot identity through musical performance in protests and festivals.

Stephanie Fajardo

stephtf@umich.edu
History, SEA studies, AAS, Philippine studies, and Gender and Sexuality

US empire in the Philippines. My research explores the management of interracial intimacies between US servicemen and Filipinas in the postwar era.

Chanese Forte

chanese@umich.edu
Environmental Health Sciences and Scientific Computing

I am a prior recipient of the CSEAS Research Grant. My research is based in Northern Thailand (Chiang Rai province).

Hilary Izatt

hizatt@umich.edu
Political Science, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies

I focus on the study of electoral politics, voter behavior and electoral manipulation in authoritarian and competitive authoritarian regimes, with a regional focus on Southeast Asia. I am particularly interested in studying how autocrats design electoral institutions to tilt playing fields, including through the strategic use of gerrymandering and malapportionment.

Cindy Lin

cindylky@umich.edu
Information Studies, Science and Technology Studies, and Indonesian studies

My dissertation traces how prestigious Indonesian government science and engineering research agencies and IBM develop data science tools to monitor and predict fires on peatland—the world’s largest terrestrial natural carbon store. The case of Indonesia—with a postcolonial state historically invested in enforcing poor and/or indigenous farmers for clearing peatland yet never developing adequate techniques to monitor peatland itself—presents an ideal site to interrogate the relationship between scientific expertise, surveillance, governance and more recently, data science. Drawing on 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork, my dissertation argues that the effects of data science to monitor peatland fires is its control and regulation of an entirely separate target: poor and indigenous famers. I am fluent in Indonesian language, and I am a native speaker of English and Mandarin.

Erin McCauliffe

erinlymc@umich.edu
Sociology

Erin is a sociologist of race, ethnicity, nationality, and immigration using qualitative and comparative-historical methods. She researches processes of citizenship verification among rural populations in Myanmar's Shan State (eastern borderlands) as well as among migrant communities in Northern Thailand. Her current project looks at the ways in which interpretations of citizenship laws, family laws, and resident/foreigner registration laws contribute to ongoing statelessness in Myanmar, particularly for orphans and children born to single mothers. I study Burmese and have previously studied Thai as well.

Paige Newhouse

panew@umich.edu
History

I research Vietnamese migration to Germany. I am specifically interested in how Vietnamese migrants shaped German immigration debates from the 1970s to the late-1990s, and their role in a new, post-Cold War understanding of migration. I currently study Vietnamese and am at the upper-intermediate level.

Eitan Paul

eitanp@umich.edu
Public Policy & Political Science

I study the effects of civil society and social accountability initiatives on the quality of democratic representation and the distribution of public goods in Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. My dissertation project seeks to explain variation in the extent to which village budget allocations align with the preferences of ordinary and marginalized citizens in Indonesia. I studied Bahasa Indonesia at U-M and Universitas Sanata Dharma in Yogyakarta. I previously conducted research and worked in Cambodia and Timor-Leste.

Megan Ryan

memary@umich.edu
Political Science, Southeast Asia, Myanmar

I study religious nationalist mobilization, specifically how state-Sangha relations interact with technological change to affect Buddhist activism in Myanmar. I also have a regional focus on Southeast Asia.

Matt Schissler

mjschiss@umich.edu
Anthropology

Anti-Muslim violence in Myanmar and inter-religious life. I am studying Burmese.

Emma Willoughby

elwillou@umich.edu
Public Health

I am a PhD student in the School of Public Health concentrating in Health Policy and political science. I’m interested in regulation of food markets and retailers, and how this affects food access in Vietnam. I am currently studying Vietnamese.

Conner Vanderbeek

csv@umich.edu
Ethnomusicology, South Asian Studies

I served as the GSI for the gamelan for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 academic years, and I am the instructor for the 2020-21 academic year. I was also the composer in residence for the gamelan and had an original piece performed on the winter 2018 concert.

Cheryl Yin

yincher@umich.edu
Linguistic Anthropology

I am looking at Khmer (Cambodian) honorific registers and how it is changing in Cambodia. For a language where there are several different ways to say "eat," depending on whether you're talking about the king eating, a monk eating, and whether you want to be formal or informal, I want to understand how Cambodians are responding to large-scale changes in their world through their use of language.

Htet Thiha Zaw

htzaw@umich.edu
Political Science, Economics, History

My research interests lie in historical political economy, education, and formal theory. Substantively, I am interested in understanding human capital investment in non-democratic states during periods of political instability and conflict, and answering related questions in the context of colonial states in Southeast Asia, particularly British Burma.