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Conversations on Europe. Learning from Memory: A Transatlantic Conversation with Susan Neiman and Michael Rothberg

Michael Rothberg,1939 Society Samuel Goetz Chair in Holocaust Studies, professor of English and comparative literature, University of California, Los Angeles; Susan Neiman, director, Einstein Forum
Friday, April 2, 2021
2:00-3:30 PM
Off Campus Location
This lecture is being presented by the Center for European Studies and Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures as the Werner Grilk Lecture in German Studies.

What can we learn from comparing different memory cultures? In particular, how might we think about Holocaust memory and the Germans’ working through the past in relation to colonial and postcolonial memory, but also to the memory of racism and slavery in the United States? How can we foster memorial cultures that create transnational spaces for solidarity and the recognition of different and often difficult histories? Working from separate vantage points, Susan Neiman (Einstein Forum) and Michael Rothberg (UCLA) have both intervened forcefully in these debates in recent months and years. We look forward to bringing them together for a transatlantic conversation with CES Director Johannes von Moltke (U-M).

Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Susan Neiman studied philosophy at Harvard and the Freie Universität Berlin, finishing her Ph.D. under the direction of John Rawls and Stanley Cavell. She was assistant and associate professor at Yale, and associate professor at Tel Aviv University, before becoming director of the Einstein Forum in 2000. She is a member of the Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaft and the American Philosophical Society. Neiman is the author of over a hundred essays and eight books, translated into many languages, most recently Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil.

Michael Rothberg is the 1939 Society Samuel Goetz Chair in Holocaust Studies and professor of English and comparative literature at the University of California, Los Angeles. His latest book is The Implicated Subject: Beyond Victims and Perpetrators (2019), published by Stanford University Press in their “Cultural Memory in the Present” series. Previous books include Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization (2009), Traumatic Realism: The Demands of Holocaust Representation (2000), and, co-edited with Neil Levi, The Holocaust: Theoretical Readings (2003). With Yasemin Yildiz, he is currently completing Inheritance Trouble: Migrant Archives of Holocaust Remembrance for Fordham University Press.

Registration for this Zoom webinar is required at https://myumi.ch/pdglQ

If there is anything we can do to make this event accessible to you, please contact us at weisercenter@umich.edu. Please be aware that advance notice is necessary as some accommodations may require more time for the university to arrange.
Building: Off Campus Location
Location: Virtual
Website:
Event Type: Lecture / Discussion
Tags: European, History, International, Politics, Social Justice
Source: Happening @ Michigan from Center for European Studies, International Institute, Weiser Center for Europe and Eurasia, Germanic Languages & Literatures